The Integration of South Carolina’s Cooperative Extension Program

The Integration of South Carolina’s Cooperative Extension Program

One hundred years ago, The Smith-Lever Act expanded land-grant colleges’ mission by establishing the Cooperative Extension Service, a national system under the USDA, to take information generated by land-grant university scientists directly to the people in each state. The Smith-Lever Act sanctioned a segregated program for African American residents by allowing states to choose to channel funds through white land-grant schools only.

Every Photograph Tells a Story

Edgar A. Brown was a long time member of the South Carolina senate and a life trustee of Clemson. Among the Edgar Brown Papers, is a photograph of an African American soldier. A note card with the photo identifies him as Alonzo B. Harley. Brown wrote that Harley was his employee and chauffeur. He also notes that he was the first soldier from Barnwell County drafted in World War II and was killed while serving as a personal aide and chauffeur to an officer in Africa.

Behind the Scenes – Part II: George “Chappie” Johnson and Herman McGee

Behind the Scenes – Part II: George “Chappie” Johnson and Herman McGee

Clemson had no African American students or faculty until after a lengthy legal battle in the early 1960s. It was rare to see any of the school’s African American employees included in any official college publications until the late 1960s (see Behind the Scenes).  However, two exceptional men who worked for the Athletic Department were(…)

Behind the Scenes

Behind the Scenes

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of the enrollment of Harvey Gantt, the first African American student legally allowed to earn his degree at Clemson.  Although Gantt was the first African American student, followed several years later by the first African American professors and professional staff, a number of African American men and women helped(…)